Site content
Venues

THE NATIONAL GALLERY

TRAFALGAR SQUARE, LONDON

THE NATIONAL GALLERY

Unlike comparable museums in continental Europe, the National Gallery was not formed by nationalising an existing royal or princely art collection. It came into being when the British government bought 38 paintings from the heirs of John Julius Angerstein, an insurance broker and patron of the arts, in 1824. After that initial purchase the Gallery was shaped mainly by its early directors, notably Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, and by private donations, which comprise two-thirds of the collection. The resulting collection is small in size, compared with many European national galleries, but encyclopaedic in scope; most major developments in Western painting "from Giotto to Cézanne" are represented with important works

Founded in 1824, it houses a collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900.

The National Gallery

It is fair therefore to say that The National Gallery houses one of the greatest collections of Western European paintings in the world. Events are held the in spectacular, versatile rooms surrounded by these great masterpieces. The Gallery can be transformed to accommodate a range of events from a grand dinner to an intimate supper party, a stylish canapé reception, to a key annual conference. All can complemented by a private view and animated guided tours given by experts. The Gallery also has an excellent range of conference facilities including a state-of-the-art lecture theatre available for hire throughout the day.

 

Capacity

300

Barry Rooms Reception

150

Barry Rooms Dinner

200

Central Hall Reception

100

Central Hall Dinner

Location

How to Get There

National Gallery

Trafalgar Square,

London WC2N 5DN

Nearest Station: Charing Cross, Leicester Square  

Nearest Buses: 24, 29, 176, 139, 6, 9, 87

Venue Specialists

Our experts, specialists and technicians are on hand to help you bring your event to life at this stunning venue. Get in touch to talk about your event at The National Gallery.

Contact Us